NCAA RESPONSIBLE FOR SECURITY LAPSES AT NIGERIA’S AIRPORTS …Retired Airport Commandant

Group Captain John Ojikutu (rtd), a one-time Military Commandant at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport, Lagos Nigeria between 1991 and 1992

Group Captain John Ojikutu (rtd), a one-time Military Commandant at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport, Lagos Nigeria between 1991 and 1992 has put at the door step of the Nigerian civil aviation regulatory body, the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) the shady security arrangement at all Nigerian airports.

Ojikutu, who was speaking at a breakfast meeting, tagged “Aviation Security In The Midst of Home Grown Terrorism “organised by Aviation Round Table Safety Initiative (ARTSI) said  “I hold the NCAA responsible for the security lapses at all the airports in the country.”

“The perimeter fences are porous. Most of the airports, including the Murtala Muhammed Airport perimeter fences do not enhance security. Arik Air has had four stowaways, an indication that the security in and around our airports is questionable.”

“If you (NCAA) cannot protect the airlines, then you are not doing your work. It is not the minister that will come and do it. It is the duty of Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority to provide the regulatory frame work that will show up the security position of Nigerian airports.”

“We have lots of gates entering our airports. International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) Annex 17, which spells out civil aviation regulations, have been reviewed several time but, in the case of the NCAA, it has not deem fit to rejig that provision to step up security in the country.”

CAPT. MUHTAR USMAN
DG NCAA

Former General Manager, Aviation Security, Federal Airports Authority of Nigeria (FAAN), who owns a private security outfit, Selective Security, opines that “corruption and indiscipline are our bane. Security operatives at the airports are not leaving up to expectations.”

“We have about 15 security checks at our major airports all for the sole aim of extorting money from travelers. The 15 security posts can be reduced to three. The laws on aviation security are old, need to be upgraded to meet challenges.”

In his own opinion, Sule Ozenua, ex-Managing Director of FAAN said: “do you realise that in this country today that we are complaining of paucity funds, we have some people still talking of building airports when we cannot provide security for the existing ones Do we not have any policy that calls for security assessment of any airports. How equipped are we with all the myriad of airports.”

“We are too sentimental in this country. We do not take time to think deep into problems confronting us. Airport security should be part of our national security. You finance the Police, Army, Immigration, Customs buqt; when it comes to aviation security how do you finance it? “Do you treat aviation security as mere parastatal requirement or as a national security that government should look at.”

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